Aston Martin DB6 – The Final Edition of the Classic DBs

Produced from September 1965 to January 1971, the DB6 had the longest production run up to that date of any Aston Martin model. The DB6 succeeded the Aston Martin DB5 and featured improved aerodynamics and specification over its predecessor.

The DB6 has a resemblance to its predecessor, the DB5; with the most noticeable differences being its wheelbase, side profile, split front and rear bumpers and rear panels incorporating the Kammback tail rear end. The tail, combined with the relocated rear-axle and the 3.75-inch (95 mm) lengthened wheelbase, provide more stability at high speed. Though fashionable — the rear-end Kamm-styled design was similar to the Ferrari 250.

Performance was satisfactory: road-tests of the day observed top speed of the Vantage model between 145 mph (233 km/h) to 148 mph (238 km/h), with John Bolster aboard a Vantage spec DB6 reaching a two-way average of 152 mph (245 km/h).

The DB6 continued with then high-tech Armstrong Selectaride cockpit-adjustable rear shock absorbers as available on the DB5. Other highlights include adopting front-door quarter windows, an oil-cooler air scoop low on the front valance, quarter-bumpers at each corner, revised tail-lamp clusters; additionally the spoiler affected the overall proportions of the DB6, with an increase in length by approximately two inches.

Other notable changes:
Roof line raised by two inches improving headroom especially for rear seat passengers
Genuinely useful leg room for rear passengers
More steeply raked albeit taller windscreen
Split front and rear bumpers
Standard chrome wire wheels
Optional power steering
Optional air conditioning
Standard ZF five-speed manual unit or a
BorgWarner three-speed automatic gearbox available at no extra cost

Optional Vantage specification retaining triple side-draft Weber 45DCOE carburetors with other minor revisions raising quoted output to 325 hp

Another major change from the DB5 to DB6 was abandonment of the full superleggera construction technique patented by coachbuilders/stylist Touring of Milan. For later DB6’s construction, the more common body-on-platform technique was used; this was primarily due to the extended rear requiring a stronger and more rigid design using folding sheet metal frames. Surprisingly the modifications combined to add only seventeen pounds weight compared to the DB5.

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